Published: Sat, November 17, 2018
Markets | By Jeffery Armstrong

Lion Air crash: Victim's fiancée takes wedding photos alone

Lion Air crash: Victim's fiancée takes wedding photos alone

Syari and Pratama, both 26, had planned to get married Sunday.

An Indonesian woman whose fiancee was on a Lion Air flight which crashed into the sea killing 189 people carried on with her wedding pictures in her dress and ring.

"He asked me to still wear my wedding gown that he chose for me on our wedding day, put on lovely make-up and hold a white rose bouquet, take good photos and send them to him".

"Thank you for giving me a sister who is so great, strong, smart, merciful and kind, just like you", Intan Syari wrote on a photo posted in tribute to her fiance Dr Rio Nanda Pratama.

"Even if I actually feel a sadness that I can't describe, I need to smile for you", she wrote. I have to stay strong as you always said to me.

The couple had been together for 13 years, and Ms Syari describes her late partner as her "first love".

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The pictures have gone viral online, receiving a flood of condolence messages from all around the world.

Lion Air JT610, a new MAX8 with only about 800 hours on the airframe, plunged into the Java Sea off Jakarta on October 29, killing all 189 people aboard.

"He asked me to still wear my wedding gown that he chose for me on our wedding day, put on attractive makeup and hold a white rose bouquet, take good photos and send them to him".

Pilots trained on the MAX weren't given even minimal briefings on MCAS, according to an interview with Jon Weaks, president of the Southwest Airlines Pilots Association published in the Seattle Times early Tuesday. "We love Dr. Rio Nanda Pratama", she captioned her photo with her sister-in-law.

Intan Syari and Rio Nanda Pratama. They knew each other since school. But God had other plans'.

Safety experts involved in the investigation said U.S. aviation officials and airline pilots hadn't been told the new system had been added to the 737 MAX aircraft.

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Even though this problem was - according to investigators - not covered in the operating manual, pilots did have access to a checklist created to turn off errant systems when the plane started nosing downwards at the wrong time, said Soejono, a Lion Air instructor who like many Indonesians goes by one name.

Now, investigators speculate the nose-down command could have been activated by an improper signal, adjusting the plane's trajectory into an irreversible dive into the ocean.

"We don't have that in the manual of the Boeing 737 MAX 8".

On October 29, Lion Air flight JT 610 crashed shortly after taking of from Jakarta.

Boeing Chairman and CEO Dennis Muilenburg defended the company on Tuesday, saying the manufacturer's bulletins highlight existing safety procedures, including the one that could have caused the Lion Air crash.

As speculation continues as to whether the flight-control system was indeed to blame for the fatal crash in Indonesia, authorities are still searching for the aircraft's black box, which could contain information on what exactly was going on in the cockpit at the time of the crash.

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