Published: Wed, October 10, 2018
IT | By Darin Griffith

Intel officially announces 9th generation Core CPUs

Intel officially announces 9th generation Core CPUs

14nm should have been replaced by 2017 at the latest; the fact that Intel will still be shipping it in 2019 as a leading-edge node is likely responsible for the node's excellent performance. There's nothing incredibly groundbreaking about the way Intel fabricates these chips, since they're based on a similar 14-nanometer production process used in the past few CPU generations. While both processors have eight physical cores, only the i9-9900K will feature Hyper-threading allowing for a 16-thread configuration. Intel has also said that the all-core frequency for the i9-9900K is 400 MHz faster than the i7-8700K. That might not seem that impressive when the Core i9-9900K can hit 5GHz. This processor has base and boost speeds of 3.6GHz and 4.9GHz, with a 12MB cache. All three of these processors will apparently work on all Z300-series motherboards, so those who bought into Z370 a year ago will be able to drop a new CPU in after a BIOS update.

Intel also learned from some of its earlier mistakes and has chose to use soldered thermal interface material (STIM) on these three 9th generation Core CPUs, which should provide increased thermal conductivity between the CPU and the IHS, provide better heat dissipation, and make the de-lidding unnecessary. The Core i5 versions are six-core designs while the i7 and i9 jump to eight cores. These SKUs finally bring core-count parity with AMD's first and second generation 8-core Ryzen CPUs in the mainstream space.

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All of the new 9th Gen Core-X CPUs support up to 68 PCIe 3.0 lanes and quad-channel DDR4 at 2666MHz.

The hardware showcased by Intel comes with fixes for the notorious Meltdown Variant 3 and L1 Terminal fault issues. It has a base clock speed of 3.1 GHz with max boosted clock speed of up to 4.3 GHz. And new Xeon workstation parts-with up to 28 cores and 56 threads-will debut in December. Here's everything you need to know.

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Intel will also sell even more powerful Core X (for "extreme") CPUs-which are really Skylake-era designs-with many more cores starting in November.

That's because Intel's truly new chips have been significantly delayed. What do you guys think of Intel's 9th Gen series so far?

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